Our Books

Antimony

With her super-sensitive sense of smell, sixteen-year-old Kaia is used to not fitting in. Add to that the pills she’s becoming dependent on, the recent death of both of her parents, and having to live with an aunt with whom she has nothing in common, and Kaia is ready for a change. So when she receives an invitation from Dr. Vadim Grigori to participate in the Grigori Young Scholars Program (GYSP) with its promise that she will meet others like herself, she jumps at the chance.

Her leap turns out to be a high-dive into mystery. The faculty of the GYSP exhibits more than an academic interest in the ancient story of the fall of the Watchers from the apocryphal 1 Enoch. Not only are the Grigoris interested in this myth, they’re obsessed with an element named in the story: antimony, useful to humans throughout history and now crucial to our everyday existence, but maybe even more vital to the Grigoris. Why are they so interested in it? What lengths will they go to get control of the earth’s supply? And what role will GYSP participants like Kaia play in their plans?

Antimony means not alone. Togetherness sounds great, but it all depends on whether you join up with the winning side . . . 

“With compelling characters and relentless revelations, Richter weaves a suspenseful mystery from threads of myth, history, science, and faith. Those who grew up reading Lewis and Rowling will love her band of brilliant high schoolers striving to uncover the dark secrets of Harvard Divinity School and its shadowy masters. Fresh, fun, and not a little frightening, Antimony is a feverish page-turner.” —J. Robert King, author of the Mad Merlin Trilogy

“This is one of the best novels I’ve read in a long time. It was a beautifully written, insanely entertaining, thought-provoking story that sucked me in from page one.” —Jamie McLauglin, television writer and producer

Common Prayer: Reflections on Episcopal Worship

Why worship? In this superb new collection of essays, lay people, clergy, poets, theologians, musicians, novelists, and scholars offer personal, profound, and provocative reflections on their experience of worship in The Episcopal Church. Through their flesh-and-blood stories of longing, loss, and love, we encounter the God who meets us in common prayer. 

“If Anglicanism claims to be catholic and reformed, then this winsome volume has the best of both: catholic in liturgy, protestant in testimony. Open this volume and meanwhile open your heart to be strangely warmed by the quirky, the moving, the profound, and the playful.” —Sam Wells, Vicar of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London

Now through November 30, 2019 enter coupon code PRAYER for 40% off Common Prayer at Wipf & Stock.

Love in Flesh and Bone

On the weekend of April 22, 2012 the St. Anne’s Church website received thousands of visitors. That Sunday, in the New York Times Magazine, an article appeared about the Rev. Dr. Amy E. Richter competing in a physique competition. The strong reactions to the article got Richter and her husband and fellow clergyperson, the Rev. Dr. Joseph Pagano, thinking about the scandal of the Incarnation. The claim that God entered fully into our flesh-and-blood human existence makes some of us squeamish. And yet, this shocking claim is at the heart of the good news that in Christ God is with us no matter what. There is nothing that can happen to us–no pain, no humiliation, no anguish–that can separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord. In sermons for the seasons of Advent, Christmas, and Epiphany, Richter and Pagano proclaim the good news of the scandalous love of God in flesh and bone.

A Man, A Woman, A Word of Love

A Man, A Woman, A Word of Love is a new collection of sermons by two of the finest preachers in the Episcopal Church today. They also happen to be married to each other. Beautifully written, compassionate, theologically astute, and oftentimes very funny, these sermons provide fresh insight into the inexhaustible riches of God’s Word. Following the unfolding story of God’s love in Scripture and tradition, Pagano and Richter lift up different dimensions of God’s love celebrated in the different seasons of the church year. Informed by the pastoral sensitivity that comes from years of serving congregations, the wisdom that comes from years of study, and the grace and wit that comes from years of marriage, Pagano and Richter offer powerful sermons that glory in the reconciling love of God and invite us into the ongoing adventure of being known, redeemed, and transformed by that love. These are sermons for everyone who wants to know and love the God who already knows and loves each and every one of us.

Enoch and the Gospel of Matthew

Matthew’s Gospel contains material unique among the canonical Gospels. What is the background for this material? Why does the writer of Matthew’s Gospel tell the story of Jesus in the way he does–including women in his genealogy, telling the story of the birth of Jesus in his particular way, and including the visit of the magi led by a star? Enoch and the Gospel of Matthew shows that the writer of Matthew was familiar with themes and traditions about the antediluvian patriarch Enoch, including the story of the fall of the angels called “watchers,” who transgress their heavenly boundaries to engage in illicit relations with women and teach them forbidden arts. The Gospel writer shows that Jesus brings about the eschatological repair of the consequences of the watchers’ fall as told in the Enochic legend. This study focuses on Matthew’s genealogy and infancy narrative and also has implications for the study of women in Matthew, since it is often through the stories of women in Matthew that the repair of the watchers’ transgression takes place.